Refreshing…

How good to hear reality and truth spoken at the start of the UN Climate Summit.   From Leonardo DiCaprio — The new “UN Messenger of Peace”:

Dare to Dream

Aligning with a “Big Why” – the dream that comes from your
heart – is cited by many entrepreneurs as the biggest single factor in
creating focus and taking quantum leaps forward.  This was confirmed in my interview with successful entrepreneur and business coach Ryan Eliason in The Big Why Telesummit earlier this year, I asked him to what he attributed his success.  His answer: committing fully to his biggest vision– his “Big Why.”   Doing so clarifies what we want and need, helps us identify what needs to happen next, and it helps us more easily say “no” to distractions so that we can say “yes” to the most difficult next step.

I am still uncovering my purpose.  I do not always know what it is, but I definitely know when I’m not aligned with it.

“I did not know.  Turns out, it is something I discovered gradually”.

“When the energy is right sometimes it’s like a magnet you just cannot resist.”

“There have been many long years when I personally had no idea what my “big why” was but I was still guided by it. It was the fact that there was a “Big Why” that comforted me in those times.”

“My “Big Why?”  This is something I just feel in my bones.”

Our “Big Why” can also be described as our audacious intention or plan, something that resonates with both our mind and our heart.    It may be a life purpose, a goal or dream or even a deep need.  It is usually something that we are deeply passionate about and it almost always is a stretch to achieve.  If the thought of your purpose both passionately excites you and creates butterflies in your stomach at the thought of pursuing it, then you are on the right track.

 The root of the word “audacious” is “to dare,” or “to be daring”.  When one chooses to be daring, it is as if the world organizes itself to help make it happen.  The intention acts as “a compass” You may not necessarily know what form the plan or organization is going to take and what you are going to need when you start, but with a compass, you can at least know if you are pointed in the right direction.



The first step in an entrepreneurial endeavor is to commit to your most audacious Big Why The approach  doesn’t have to be perfect, it’s not going to necessarily be the only thing of which you decide, but a decision has to be made to commit to a big intention

The steps for finding your “Big Why” may vary for you—you may already know it or maybe you do not.  I would challenge you to experiment.  Explore and discover the nutrients that you need—activities, practices or ways of being that feed the soil of your spirit so YOU can create the conditions for your work to emerge into the world–whatever it is meant to be—large or small.  When we set our intention—it helps to think big, audacious even.  Our intention fuels our further work. 

What is Permaculture?

At first look, permaculture, also known as regenerative design or ecological agriculture, (permanent agriculture) is an ecologically-based design system which allows us to improve our relationship with the land by observing and imitating nature, while using and integrating natural systems and methods rather than fighting against them. Permaculture ethics, root practices and principles are those of nature herself, and can be applied to the garden, the farm, and indeed any living system including human structures.

However, in practice, permaculture also cultivates a way of being that tends to go much deeper than simply a system of ecological design. Somehow, by engaging with nature in intimate observation, we gradually become a part of the system and magically and necessarily engage in our own evolution and transformation. In fact, the ethics, principles, and roots of permaculture practice, can go far beyond the garden or farm and into the invisible structures of our relationships with ourselves and others, as well as our community and organizational structures. By engaging in permaculture, one soon and eagerly applies the approach to other complex systems and challenges.

One of the key tenets of permaculture is relationship. Everything gardens. In an actual garden, this is easy to observe, over time. Every element in a garden, whether it is a plant, an insect, a rock, a pond, animals, a tree or a structure, has an effect on the others. The effect, in most cases, is predictable just by observing the nature of the element placed.

For example, where I live in Northern California, a large rock in a garden covers the soil preserving moisture, creates habitat for frogs and lizards, provides shade at certain times of the day, and may even create a small micro-climate for some plants. The rock, by its very being, its relationships and its placement, is gardening. It might be fair to say that we, like the rock, need simply find our appropriate place and relationships to create a beneficial impact. And, like the rock, we might have a detrimental impact if we are not in the appropriate relationships or place.

So, permaculture offers a way to engage with the world on a small scale, while keeping in mind a vision for the larger design. This is how nature works: a set of laws or principles, such as gravity and atomic bonds, are true for all systems, and nature uses the same elemental building blocks to evolve many diverse, intelligent, systems—systems that evolve from small experiments into successful co-creative regenerative ecosystems.

By understanding how systems work and especially how they change, we can accept that we are doing our part by doing what we do well and what we feel the energy to do.  We work at what brings us joy.  We can look for those points of leverage where a small amount of applied energy can have a large impact.   Paradoxically, by focusing on small solutions, we find meaning and purpose even in the face of the larger destruction around us.

“Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.” –Archimedes