Need hope?

UPDATED 6pm 9/22

The after-watch party is as good as the movie!  Here is the party link on youtube:

https://youtu.be/emfG6ehpE4U

UPDATED 9/22/2020

Yes, solutions are still possible! If you need hope, then watch this KISS THE GROUND trailer.

Kiss the Ground THE MOVIE premiers September 22, 2020!  

NEXT STEPS

STEP 1: WATCH THE FILM. The 87 minute film is on Netflix. Watch now! here is link to the movie:

https://www.netflix.com/title/81321999?s=i&trkid=13747225

STEP 2: JOIN THE BIGGER “KISS THE GROUND” WATCH PARTY — with cast and filmmakers: here is a link to RSVP – (with cast and crew) at 6pm on FB live: https://kissthegroundmovie.com/watchparty/

The event details are on FB here: https://www.facebook.com/events/314340939677266/

STEP 3: CONTINUE THE LOCAL CONVERSATION 

here is a link to the New Story mighty network where we can chat about it before, during and after

https://network.newstorycenter.com/posts/kiss-the-ground.

Lessons from Pachamama – Coming Home

Coming Home

Just days after we returned home to Lake County, we were evacuated for 12 days due to the Ranch fire.  We worried about the loss of our place and struggled with the nearly unbreathable air.

I was reminded of the greatest gift of all from the jungle–the gift of LIFE…. of breath, remembering how easy it was to breathe there. The comparison will inform my work for years to come.

Which future world do we want to create?

Charles Eisenstein (author of The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible) says this:

“Is it too much to ask, to live in a world where our human gifts go toward the benefit of all? Where our daily activities contribute to the healing of the biosphere and the well-being of other people?”

The lessons from Pachamama suggest that it is possible to live meaningful life and create a just and sustainable planet. To create “the more beautiful world our hearts know is possible,” we must commit to it and embrace the adventure.

How would we do this?  Again, let’s listen to Pachamama… specifically her insights delivered through her wise and dignified indigenous peoples.  Here is what she is saying to us:

(1) Pay attention. Be present to your next courageous step

(2) Be open to whatever comes–perhaps it is a new dream — one of appreciating beauty, and creating beauty, and

(3) Trust the adventure

After all, this journey is meant to be about love not fear.

Lessons from Pachamama – The Second Gift

“When the Self emerges, the ego takes a hit”



The Second Gift

I knew before the trip that the Achuar interpret their dreams at four a.m. and we would be invited to join them. What I did not know was that we would face this same treacherous jungle trail –only this time, it would be in the dark and in a downpour .

We retired early the night before in anticipation of a three a.m. wake-up and hike to the home of one of the Achuar families.  We were instructed to bring our dream and they would interpret them.

It rained all night long.. and I kept waking up, growing increasingly anxious about that hike through the jungle in the dark.  I told myself i was worried about Loretta (I was).  But i was just as worried about ME.

I decided that if I did not receive a dream, I would stay at our camp with her should she decide to stay. At three a.m., one of our campmates reported to Loretta that the guides were considering cancelling the trip because it was too treacherous.  As a result, Loretta decided to stay at camp.

I did not have a dream that night. So I stayed behind , my ego taking another hit.  At first, I felt disappointed… coming all this way and not joining the morning dream circle. But I got 3 more hours sleep and I told myself that I would get another chance when we visited with the Sapura people.

Those who decide to venture out that night came back with the report that it was not at all what they expected.  The dream interpretation was basic: It is going to rain today. Hunting will be good tomorrow.  Was this it? I guess I expected something more mystical and profound. Turns out, I did have expectations! It was time to let them go.

By the time we were with the Sapura people a few days later, I had let go of all “mystical dream interpretation” expectations. So when I presented my dream to the group,  I was ready to receive what Manari, the shaman, had to say.  He said: “You see light because you are light.” That night I heard Pachamama:”you are here to appreciate beauty and to create beauty. Be open to what comes. You will know what to do”

The second gift:  Be open to what comes. We are light.  We are here to appreciate beauty and create beauty.

We will know what to do.

Lessons from Pachamama – The First Gift


The First Gift

Once in Ecuador, after a couple days acclimating and exploring the city of Quito, we headed out by bus to the edge rainforest, arriving at the airport city of Shell where we were issued tall mud boots for our jungle adventure. Thanks to our guides and a talented bush pilot, we were deposited on a dirt airstrip in the middle of the Amazon rainforest. There, we gathered under a thatched roof and our faces were painted by one of the Aschuar women. Once our entire group  arrived,  we set off into the jungle on foot led by our Aschuar hosts.  As we slogged through on the muddy trail, the Aschuar women nimbly jogged by us with our luggage on their backs and were quickly out of sight.

In the very first hour on the very first trail in the jungle, we came to a bog where we needed to make our way across via a series of narrow and slippery logs. I felt  confident, surefooted and agile in my new mud yellow boots, but I worried about Loretta who was less physically able than I.  So, I glanced back to see how she was doing. I could see that she was well cared for by Kuha, a young, strong Aschuar man, but that glance cost me. I mis-planted my walking stick, shifted my weight a little too soon…

And PLOP! I slipped right off that log into thigh-deep muddy water.  I was rescued rather unceremoniously by Kuha. I scrambled up the far bank with now water-filled boots.

This was the first gift  of the jungle:  Pay Attention.  Be present. Take one step at a time.  My pickled feet sloshing in squishy boots were a constant reminder that day to watch my footing. From that point forward, for the duration of the journey, I was focused on where I was, where my walking stick was placed, where my feel were, and what was around me. I was the first (but not the last) in our group to tumble in the mud and learn the lesson of paying attention.

Next: The Second Gift